FAQ

What does SPCA stand for?

Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Is the Saskatoon SPCA somehow related to other SPCAs?

No, the Saskatoon SPCA is autonomous and not affiliated with any other SPCA. We often work in partnership with other organizations in animal welfare, but we are an independent agency.

What is the difference between the Saskatoon SPCA and the Saskatchewan SPCA?

The Saskatoon SPCA is our city’s only animal shelter. We provide care to approximately 4 000 homeless, lost, abandoned, neglected, and abused animals in Saskatoon every year. In addition to raising awareness about responsible pet ownership, we also provide adoption programs, lost and found, humane education, foster care, and volunteer programs. The Saskatoon SPCA is also responsible for enforcing Saskatchewan’s Animal Protection Act, 2018 to investigate complaints and seize animals from situations of cruelty, neglect and abuse through our Animal Protection Services. 

The Saskatchewan SPCA is an education-based organization that provides resources to the public and other animal welfare agencies to help better the treatment of animals in Saskatchewan. They do not have a shelter to house animals, and they can not investigate cases of animal cruelty or neglect.

Does the Saskatoon SPCA receive government funding?

No, we do not receive ongoing funding from any level of government that we serve. We rely on donations, grants, and the support of our community to continue supporting local animals in need. The cost of running the Saskatoon SPCA is over $1 million per year.

How long can an animal stay at the Saskatoon SPCA?

No animal is at our shelter is ever assigned a "time limit". As long as they remain both physically and mentally healthy, the animal will remain on our adoption floor until we can find them a happy home. We’ve had pets spend more than 4 months up for adoption before finally meeting their forever families! 

If an animal ends up at the SPCA, and it's old, won't you just "put it down"?

We do not euthanize healthy, behaviourally sound animals, nor do we euthanize animals because of old age. In fact, many adopters specifically ask to adopt our most senior residents! We are proud to maintain a live release rate of over 80% for our animals.

Why doesn’t the Saskatoon SPCA give animals away or charge a smaller adoption fee?

We provide care to an average of 4 000 animals annually. Most of these animals require some level of medical attention above and beyond routine veterinary checkups and vaccinations, and some remain in our care for as much as 6 months before recovering from their illnesses of injuries and being made available for adoption. We spend an average of $23 per animal per day on basic food and shelter, spay and neuter services cost an additional $120 per animal, and additional medical care averages $75 per animal. It’s easy to see how much these costs add up, but we do it because we love animals and because we know they deserve a second chance at life.

The benefits of adoption are huge, and with all the perks included in the fee, you’ll actually save money on your pet in the long run! Adoption fees include the completed spay/neuter surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations and deworming treatments, a microchip implant, and a complimentary health examination at the participating vet clinic of your choice. Adopting is the best deal in town!

Why is having my pet spayed or neutered so important?

Even strictly indoor pets can make the occasional escape and when an unaltered animal is on the loose, they're on a mission to multiply! Spaying and neutering your pets is the best way to prevent animal homelessness, and it’s also a crucial component of responsible pet ownership. All cats and dogs adopted from the Saskatoon SPCA must be spayed or neutered prior to adoption.

I can't keep my own pet anymore. Can I just bring it in to the SPCA?

No. We ask for the community's help to keep animals out of our facility whenever possible, so we first ask that you try to rehome the pet yourself. If you are unable to rehome them and wish to surrender your pet to the shelter, please call us at 306-374-7387 and have your name put on our waitlist. As soon as there is shelter space available, we will contact you to bring your pet in for surrender.  

Why do you request an owner surrender fee when someone needs to give up their pet?

The owner surrender fee covers a small portion of what it costs us to care for each animal that stays at our facility. 

Should I contact the Saskatoon SPCA if my pet has gone missing?

Yes! Anyone missing a pet should file a “lost” report with us. Our staff will be able to check for your beloved pet in the City of Saskatoon’s pound, which is housed in our facility, as well as cross-check your report with any animal that comes through our doors and with any “found” reports we may receive from other members of the public. We will continue this service for 3 days. If you still have not found your pet after those 3 days, we can keep your report on file for up to 1 year for a small fee.

Who should I contact if I suspect an animal is being abused or neglected?

If you believe any companion animal is being neglected or abused in the City of Saskatoon, call us at 306-374-7387 or visit our website to file a confidential report with our Animal Protection Services. Upon receiving your complaint, an Animal Protection Officer will investigate the case and take whatever corrective actions they feel necessary to protect the welfare of the animal in question. 

If you feel that an animal is in imminent danger of death or injury, you can reach our emergency after-hours staff at the number above 24/7. You can also call Saskatoon Police Service.

What items are best for me to donate to the Saskatoon SPCA?

We prefer monetary donations as this allows us the flexibility to purchase whatever items we are most in need of at any given time. If you're specifically hoping to donate pet supplies, however, those are always welcome too!

We are always in need of canned wet cat food, non-clumping cat litter, dry kibble for kittens and puppies, durable dog toys, special diet food such as gastrointestinal and grain-free formulas, kitten milk replacement, and laundry supplies such as liquid laundry detergent, dryer sheets, and bleach.